Now 6D holograms that interact with light

18 09 2008

Indian origin scientist has claimed to have found success in creating six dimensional images that respond to changes in light and the viewer’s direction by utilizing basic technology used in cheap 3D postcards and novelty items.

The researcher says that the response of the six-dimensional holograms to light could be better understood by visualizing what would happen if a flashlight is shone on a real flower and a holographic one simultaneously.

While the display is still pretty small, seven by seven pixels, the researchers hope that within the next two to three years they could scale it up to create some of the most realistic images available.

“We are the first ones to build a display that changes with lighting,” says Associate Professor Ramesh Raskar, a scientist at Massachusetts Institute of Technology who helped to develop the technology. “We’ve finally found a way to build the most realistic display.”

The idea is similar to the technology used on stiff, cheap plastic postcards, the kind when rotated causes an image to move or make it 3D.

These postcards use a series of raised parallel lines to create tiny lenses that project different images at either vertical or horizontal angles. The effect can make an image of a car appear like it’s moving down a road or a hand appear like it’s waving as you tilt the card one way and then another.

Instead of using parallel lines to create the image, the researchers used squares to create lenses that present different images at both vertical and horizontal angles simultaneously.

ABC





Kate Moss’ Hologram

29 06 2008

I came across a fantastic video of supermodel Kate Moss being projected as a life-size hologram at the showcase of Alexander McQueen collection at the 2006 Ready-to-Wear fashion show in Paris.

Of course, it is an old video but the sheer beauty of how the holographic image has been presented is breathtaking! I am confident that the live audience that witnessed the phenomenon must have been mesmerized.

What do you say, guys? 🙂





Holographic Rock Concerts… any takers?

17 04 2008

Former SYSTEM OF A DOWN frontman SERJ TANKIAN is urging eco-conscious rockers to stop showing up for gigs – and project themselves as a hologram through holography on stage instead to save the environment. The rocker claims his peers could cut down on emissions by getting holographic technology.

He says, “I think we could reduce our need to travel if we could project ourselves into meetings and concerts. We have the technology, and we’re not using it right now. There would be no travel costs, so bands with very little money could play shows, and tickets would cost less.”

However, the question is if the fans will be as enthusiastic about the idea as Tankian seems to be. I personally will miss the aura of a LIVE performance. Going by Tankian’s idea, it would be more or less like watching the gig on a giant TV screen along with many other fans and that’s it! No real rush of blood! No real headbanging! No fun!

I hope not many rockers will listen to the guy!

What do you say, fellow rockers?





Queen Elizabeth’s new Hologram images

3 03 2008

After Prince Charles’ holograms, it is time once again for UK’s Queen Elizabeth to grace the world with her holographic images!

The artist who created a hologram portrait of the Queen four years ago is to demonstrate previously unseen 3D and light-based images of the Queen in a London show.

Chris Levine’s images, worth £1m collectively, show the Queen in various off-guard moments.

Must be a treat for the Queen’s loyalists!





Rewritable Holographic Display

24 02 2008

Researchers claim to have developed rewritable holographic displays!

The iconic image of three-dimensional holography—Princess Leia inserting Death Star blueprints into R2-D2 and intoning, “Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi. You’re my only hope”—may be just a few years away from reality, says a researcher who has developed a method to write, erase, and rewrite holographic images.

Holographic motion, as featured in Star Wars, has long been confined to the realm of science fiction. But now, according to Nasser Peyghambarian, a professor of optical sciences at the University of Arizona, “we can see we are pretty close to that.”

Peyghambarian and his colleagues at Arizona have found a way to create holograms that can persist for hours but can also be erased and written over. The group worked with researchers from Nitto Denko Technical Corp., in Oceanside, Calif., the research arm of a Japanese company that makes semiconductor and optical products.

Conventional holograms are written using a laser beam split into two out-of-phase beams. One beam bounces off the object being imaged before it recombines with the other beam to create an interference pattern. When that pattern strikes the holographic medium—usually a photosensitive polymer—the material undergoes chemical changes that alter its index of refraction. If you shine a light on the finished hologram, the refraction pattern recreates a 3-D image of the original object. But because the chemical change is nonreversible, these standard materials can be written on only once.

IEEE 





Smart Hologram – Better Health Care

4 02 2008

Another landmark in the health care and hologram sectors! Scientists have developed smart holograms to help patients self diagnose!

Patients with diabetes, cardiac problems, kidney disorders or high blood pressure could benefit from the development of new hologram technology. The new “smart” holograms, which can detect changes in, for example, blood-glucose levels, should make self-diagnosis much simpler, cheaper and more reliable, write Chris Lowe and Cynthia Larbey in February’s Physics World.

A hologram is a recording of an optical interference pattern created when laser light shone on an object is made to overlap with a separate beam of light that does not pass through the object. When light is shone onto the interference pattern, a 3D image of the original object is recreated.

Traditional holograms, like those on your credit card, are stored on photo-sensitive materials and remain unchanged with time. Smart holograms, however, use materials called hydrogels that shrink or swell in response to local environmental conditions. Such holograms can therefore be used as sensors to detect chemical imbalances in potentially fatal situations.

Smart Holograms, a spin-out company from the Institute of Biotechnology at Cambridge University, has already developed a hand-held syringe to measure water content in aviation fuel tanks — necessary because aeroplane engines are liable to freeze mid-air if there is more than 30 parts water to million fuel.

Science Daily 

I must say that the new hologram technology will be a boon to many struggling with ailments. Kudos to the team who developed the smart hologram. Hope that smart hologram will be available in the markets soon.





Holographic Water Horse

28 01 2008

This is one of the best demonstrations of holographic technology as an effective advertising tool! Sony Pictures have created this out-of-the-world hologram to advertise their upcoming film ‘The Water Horse’, to project the Nessie image over a very fine mist being sprayed in the air. The effect is extraordinary.

Just imagine the hysteria amongst the crowds to see a monster come alive in front of their eyes through the intelligent use of holography!