Holographic Water Horse

28 01 2008

This is one of the best demonstrations of holographic technology as an effective advertising tool! Sony Pictures have created this out-of-the-world hologram to advertise their upcoming film ‘The Water Horse’, to project the Nessie image over a very fine mist being sprayed in the air. The effect is extraordinary.

Just imagine the hysteria amongst the crowds to see a monster come alive in front of their eyes through the intelligent use of holography!





Holograms with new microscopic lettering

18 01 2008

Dai Nippon Printing Co. of Tokyo, Japan will market a new hologram label that combines 3-D computer graphic images with microscopic lettering.

Branded products use hologram labels to prove their authenticity, but in recent years the technology of forgery has advanced so far that it is difficult to distinguish real hologram labels from bogus hologram labels just by looking at the 3-D CG image.

To help people identify real labels, Dai Nippon Printing will incorporate the word GENUINE in microscopic lettering into the hologram. The letters are drawn with a line width of only 50 microns and are technically difficult to print, but readily viewable using a magnifying glass.

Dai Nippon Printing will charge 5 yen apiece for orders of 2 million labels and hopes to generate revenue of 3 billion yen (US$28 million) with this business during the next three years.





Fake Euro alert in Cyprus

15 01 2008

Cyprus Police Department is in contact with Europol, as part of efforts to infiltrate a gang bringing forged euros and fake credit cards into Cyprus.

The general public has been alerted to be on the lookout for fake euros, with 24 cases of counterfeit currency notes having been reported to the police since the introduction of the currency to Cyprus.

The European Central Bank has emphasized that various security features have been incorporated into the euro notes that will help in recognizing a genuine banknote from a counterfeit eoru note. These features include:

  • The raised print. Special printing processes give banknotes their unique feel. The ink should feel raised or thicker in the main image, the lettering and the value numerals on the front of the banknotes.
  • Additional tactile marks for the visually impaired are included on the bottom edge of the €200 banknote and on the right-hand edge of the €500. The paper consists of pure cotton, which feels crisp and firm (not limp or waxy).
  • When a banknote is held up against light: the watermark, the security thread and the see-through number will then be visible. All three features can be seen from the front and back of genuine banknotes.
  • The security thread is embedded in the banknote paper. Holding the banknote against the light shows the thread as a dark stripe. The word ‘EURO’ and the value can be seen in tiny letters on the stripe. In the hologram one can see perforations which form the symbol. One can also see small numbers showing the value.
  • When the banknote is tilted, on the front one can see the shifting image on the hologram. On the back, one can see the glossy stripe (on the €5, €10 and €20 banknotes) or the colour-changing number (on the €50, €100, €200 and €500 banknotes), from purple to olive green or brown.

According to the ECB in the second half of 2007 a total of 296,000 counterfeit euro banknotes were withdrawn from circulation.